250.542.1122 or Text 250.540.0656 Transition House. Help is available 24/7 (Including Holidays)

How can you help end Violence against women?

Domestic violence is defined as people using abusive behaviour to control or hurt their partners. This can happen between married, separated or divorced people, current/ former common-law partners, current/ former dating partners and other intimate partners.

Domestic violence knows no boundaries —white, black, young, old, rich, poor, educated, not educated. Sometimes violence begins early on in a relationship and other times it takes months or even years to appear.

We recognize the power that each one of us has in making a difference for someone.

This year, Archway Society for Domestic Peace and Turning Points Collaborative Society is asking our community to join the conversation  and share our awareness posts on your social media. By sharing YOU have taken the first step- YOU have helped to raise awareness in your community.

Change can start with YOU.

One person’s actions may seem insignificant, but together as a community we can lead to real social transformation.

 

We are asking North Okanagan community members to take notice, understand, take action and be part of the awareness campaign.

 

How you can help your neighbor, co-worker, friend or family member:

 

1. Take notice: don’t ignore it

2. Understand: listen without criticism or judgment

3. Take action: know who to call & be prepared to help

4.Be part of the awareness campaign: share the awareness posts on your social media.

 

Theses are SHAREABLE GRAPHICS. Right click and save as to use this photos on your social media. You call follow us on social media.

 USE HASHTAGS: 

 #LISTEN. #BELIEVE. #ACT.

 #bemyvoice  #makethecall  #courageovercomfort 

 

KNOW THE SIGNS

While red flags aren’t always proof that someone is being mistreated, they are worth knowing. Many who are abused may try to cover up what is happening to them for a variety of reasons.

To understand and recognize what you may be witnessing click here. 

 

 

BE A RESOURCE

There are local, provincial and national resources available to people experiencing domestic violence. From websites to crisis phone lines and shelters. Locally, Archway Society operates a 24-Hour Crisis and Information Line; not only for women experiencing violence, but for anyone who might have questions or concerns regarding domestic violence and abuse – call 250-542-1122 or text 250-540-0656.

ACT

  • If you or someone you know is in immediate danger call 911. 
  • Archway Society operates a 24-Hour Crisis and Information Line; not only for women experiencing violence, but for anyone who might have questions or concerns regarding domestic violence and abuse – call 250-542-1122 or text 250-540-0656.

ARE YOU AWARE?

On average, it takes a woman seven attempts to leave an abuser before ending the relationship permanently. 

Worldwide, 1 in 3 women have experienced physical or sexual violence — mostly by an intimate partner.

6x Indigenous women are killed at six times the rate of non-Indigenous women.

Approximately every 6 days, a woman in Canada is killed by her intimate partner.

A victim’s reasons for staying with their abusers are extremely complex and, in most cases, are based on the reality that their abuser will follow through with the threats they have used to keep them trapped: the abuser will hurt or kill them, they will hurt or kill the kids, they will win custody of the children, they will harm or kill pets or others, they will ruin their victim financially — the list goes on.

Abusers repeatedly go to extremes to prevent the victim from leaving. In fact, the period after leaving an abuser is the most dangerous time for a victim of domestic violence. One study found in interviews with men who have killed their partners that either threats of separation by their partner or actual separations were most often the precipitating events that lead to the murder.

The victim in violent relationships knows their abuser best and fully knows the extent to which they will go to make sure they have and can maintain control over the victim.

BE READY

If someone you know is thinking about leaving or is in fear the violence will escalate, be ready to help. Create a signal or phrase that can indicate imminent need or escalating danger.  Keep your phone with you and the ringer on, make sure you have gas in your car and discuss an escape plan or meeting place ahead of time.

BE A WITNESS

Document every incident you witness or are told about;  include the date, time, location, injuries and circumstances. This information could be very useful in later police reports and court cases, both criminal and civil.

 

No one wants to believe that someone they care about is being harmed by a person that claims to love them. Often, people will ignore their gut instinct and deny something is wrong or tell themselves it isn’t their business.

Unfortunately, it has become a common mentality amongst society when an individual witnesses an act of abuse to turn the other way.  Family violence and domestic abuse is a community issue. It is everyone’s business. YOU have a role to play in ending it.

Don’t ignore it. 

Police officers hear the same thing from witnesses again and again—I heard, saw, or perceived domestic violence but didn’t want to or know how to  get involved. If you hear your neighbors engaged in a violent situation, call 911. It could save a life.

 

If you think that a friend or someone you know is in an abusive or unhealthy relationship, it can be difficult to know what to do. You may want to help, but be scared to lose them as a friend or feel as though it is not your place to step in. All of these feelings are normal, but one of the most important things you can do as a friend is listen. Listening can help someone to break the silence around their situation.

Listen to your friend and let them open up about the situation on their own terms. Don’t be forceful with the conversation. It may be very hard for your friend to talk about their relationship, but remind them that they are not alone and that you want to help.

 

The majority of victims of violence turn to someone they know for help first.  How family members, friends, neighbors or co-workers respond is incredibly important in shaping what the victim does next. 

We all have a role to play in preventing family and domestic violence.

We are asking our community to join the conversation  and share our awareness posts on your social media.

By sharing YOU have taken the first step- YOU have helped to raise awareness in your community.

Theses are SHAREABLE GRAPHICS. Right click and save as to use this photos on your social media. You call follow us on social media.

USE HASHTAGS: 

#LISTEN. #BELIEVE. #ACT.

#bemyvoice  #makethecall  #courageovercomfort 

 

3 Words Can Make All The Difference……….      I BELIEVE YOU 

Historically, survivors have been afraid to disclose for fear of not being believed or blamed. Many never tell anyone. Then because so few domestic violence cases are reported – most abusers walk free. It’s time to end this cycle. It all starts with YOU. When someone tells you they were or are being abused, believe them.

The majority of victims of violence turn to someone they know for help first.  How family members, friends, neighbors or co-workers respond is incredibly important in shaping what the victim does next. 

Victims often feel alone and maybe minimizing what is really happening it could be more serious than you think. 

Let them know it’s not their fault. No one asks for this to happen to them. If you’ve doubted someone in the past, remember it’s never too late to start believing.

Ask what you can do to help.

Whether or not may not ever fully understand what they’re going through. Remember … You don’t need to fix the situation. Acknowledge that the situation is not ok. Ask how you can help.

Check in regularly. 

If a loved one or friend is in danger, reach out regularly to ensure their safety.

Often, the best way to help a victim of domestic violence isn’t through direct intervention–which can be dangerous for everyone involved.  But that doesn’t mean there aren’t important steps that friends, family members and bystanders who witness abusive situations can take to support victims and help them get to safety.

Lives may depend on it.
If you see or hear domestic violence or child abuse in your neighborhood or in a public place, make the call. Don’t worry about whether the couple or person will be angry with you for calling. It could be a matter of life and death, and it’s better to be safe than sorry. If you are afraid for your own safety, you don’t have to give your name.

It’s not easy to watch someone you love go through the trauma and turmoil of domestic violence. With love, patience and awareness, your support can be a powerful tool helping them through this terrible time.

Domestic violence has often been viewed as a private, family matter. But it’s not. It’s a social issue. A community safety issue.  A public health epidemic. It can impact anyone, regardless of gender, age, sexual orientation, race, or education and income level. 

On average, it takes a woman seven attempts to leave an abuser before ending the relationship permanently.  Whether or not you were able to change the outcome of the situation, by stepping in you could help change these statistics. Offering non-judgmental, compassionate support is a powerful way to help end violence and make positive change in our community.    

To prevent and end domestic violence, as a society we need to acknowledge and understand that victims never deserve, nor should be blamed for, the abuse they endure–abusers are skilled at using power and control over their victims. We need to be willing to speak up and out against unhealthy relationship behaviors and to support victims and survivors in restoring safety and autonomy.

It’s time to end the cycle of silence right here, right now, starting with you.

By sharing YOU have taken the first step- YOU have helped to raise awareness in your community.

Theses are SHAREABLE GRAPHICS. Right click and save as to use this photos on your social media. You call follow us on social media.

USE HASHTAGS: 

#LISTEN. #BELIEVE. #ACT.

#bemyvoice  #makethecall  #courageovercomfort 

#ACT

  • If you or someone you know is in immediate danger call 911.
  • If you have questions or concerns regarding domestic violence ; call the Archway Society 24 Hour Crisis and Information Line 250-542-1122 or text 250-540-0656
  • Community-Based Victim Services 250-542-3322
  • Child Protection Line 310-1234

Use Your Influence
If you shared any of this year’s campaign posts, you have helped to raise awareness in our community.

Use your Freedom
COVID-19 has greatly limited what little freedom some victims had.  Someone experiencing violence may not be able to research shelters, escape plans or set up necessities like bank accounts and cell phones while living with his or her abuser. Offer to help. And keep things confidential. 

Use Your Voice
Refuse to support conversation, movies, video games, or music that glorifies violence, particularly against women.

Make a Donation
Your financial support provides significant and immediate support to victims of domestic violence as they endeavour to rebuild their lives and the lives of their children. Please use this link to donate securely online.

DO Take Care of Yourself

It’s possible you may start feeling emotionally or physically exhausted as the result of supporting a friend or family member in an emotionally abusive relationship – this is known as compassion fatigue.

It’s important that if you are supporting someone in an emotionally abusive relationship that you make sure you check-in with yourself and to seek support if you find yourself feeling overwhelmed, helpless, or prioritizing other people’s needs before your own.